Race without Racists: A Critical Look At France’s Outlawing of ‘Race’

shatteredlavender:

image

Bonilla-Silva’s most persuasive and strongest claims in Race without Racists are the abstract liberalism and minimization of racism frameworks. Abstract liberalism is described as involving political and economic liberalism “in an abstract manner to explain racial matters,” while minimization of racism alludes to discrimination being “no longer a central factor affecting minorities” (Bonilla-Silva, Race without Racists, 28-29).  In 2013, France’s National Ambassy outlawed the usage of the term ‘race’: “From now on, the word ‘racial’, as well as ‘race’, will be dropped from relevant articles of the French penal code, or replaced by the word ‘ethnic’” (Harvey Morris, "France Fights Racism by Outlawing ‘Race’", International New York Times). France has a history of colonization and involvement in the deportation of Jews to concentration camps during World War II. In an effort to leave the past behind and reduce current racial violence, the French Ambassy relinquished the surface-level infiltration of the concept of race and its legacy. France’s horrid past, its impact on its present and its incompatibility with the country’s current beliefs are evidence of what social psychologist Leon Festinger defines as cognitive dissonance, which is causing France’s leadership to erase what it perceives as the problem—race (Eshleman, O’Malley Halley and Vijaya, Seeing White: An Introduction to White Privilege and Race, 191). Bonilla-Silva’s infrastructure for identifying and analyzing color-blind racism is key to examining this phenomenon.

As France attempts to minimize racism through the implementation of abstract liberalism, the country fails to recognize that it is furthering the oppression of the racialized collectives. Academic writers in The Guardian—Alana Lentin and Valerie Amirauz—argue that the demise of ‘race thinking’ in France will result from the elimination of ‘racial’ and ‘race’ from the French Constitution and laws (Harvey Morris, "France Fights Racism by Outlawing ‘Race’", International New York Times). France’s minimization of racism utterly disregarded the past and contemporary discrimination of the status of minorities socially, economically and educationally (Bonilla-Silva, Race without Racists, 31). New racism will have an environment to manifest within; visible expressions of violence against individuals based upon race in France may be altered to more subtle expressions. Dominant actors will justify such occurrences by pointing to nonracial explanations, which will conceal the core of race’s existence and its systematic impact on populations.

-S.L.

(via frantzfandom)

terarroni:

thisbombasspussygoticktick:

sisoula:

Cause Black people can damn well read theirs.

truly

Scientific fact, actually. Researchers at the University of Toronto Scarbrough found that White people’s neuron system fired less when viewing people of color performing…

america-wakiewakie:

"This Nonviolent Stuff’ll Get You Killed: How Guns Made the Civil Rights Movement Possible" by Charles E. Cobb Jr. | AmazonVisiting Martin Luther King Jr. at the peak of the Montgomery, Alabama bus boycott, journalist William Worthy almost sat on a loaded pistol. “Just for selfdefense,” King assured him. It was not the only weapon King kept for such a purpose; one of his advisors remembered the reverend’s Montgomery, Alabama home as “an arsenal.”Like King, many ostensibly “nonviolent” civil rights activists embraced their constitutional right to selfprotection—yet this crucial dimension of the Afro-American freedom struggle has been long ignored by history. In This Nonviolent Stuff’ll Get You Killed, civil rights scholar Charles E. Cobb Jr. describes the vital role that armed self-defense played in the survival and liberation of black communities in America during the Southern Freedom Movement of the 1960s. In the Deep South, blacks often safeguarded themselves and their loved ones from white supremacist violence by bearing—and, when necessary, using—firearms. In much the same way, Cobb shows, nonviolent civil rights workers received critical support from black gun owners in the regions where they worked.Whether patrolling their neighborhoods, garrisoning their homes, or firing back at attackers, these courageous men and women and the weapons they carried were crucial to the movement’s success. Giving voice to the World War II veterans, rural activists, volunteer security guards, and self-defense groups who took up arms to defend their lives and liberties, This Nonviolent Stuff’ll Get You Killed lays bare the paradoxical relationship between the nonviolent civil rights struggle and the Second Amendment. Drawing on his firsthand experiences in the civil rights movement and interviews with fellow participants, Cobb provides a controversial examination of the crucial place of firearms in the fight for American freedom.

america-wakiewakie:

"This Nonviolent Stuff’ll Get You Killed: How Guns Made the Civil Rights Movement Possible" by Charles E. Cobb Jr. | Amazon

Visiting Martin Luther King Jr. at the peak of the Montgomery, Alabama bus boycott, journalist William Worthy almost sat on a loaded pistol. “Just for selfdefense,” King assured him. It was not the only weapon King kept for such a purpose; one of his advisors remembered the reverend’s Montgomery, Alabama home as “an arsenal.”

Like King, many ostensibly “nonviolent” civil rights activists embraced their constitutional right to selfprotection—yet this crucial dimension of the Afro-American freedom struggle has been long ignored by history. In This Nonviolent Stuff’ll Get You Killed, civil rights scholar Charles E. Cobb Jr. describes the vital role that armed self-defense played in the survival and liberation of black communities in America during the Southern Freedom Movement of the 1960s. In the Deep South, blacks often safeguarded themselves and their loved ones from white supremacist violence by bearing—and, when necessary, using—firearms. In much the same way, Cobb shows, nonviolent civil rights workers received critical support from black gun owners in the regions where they worked.

Whether patrolling their neighborhoods, garrisoning their homes, or firing back at attackers, these courageous men and women and the weapons they carried were crucial to the movement’s success. Giving voice to the World War II veterans, rural activists, volunteer security guards, and self-defense groups who took up arms to defend their lives and liberties, This Nonviolent Stuff’ll Get You Killed lays bare the paradoxical relationship between the nonviolent civil rights struggle and the Second Amendment. Drawing on his firsthand experiences in the civil rights movement and interviews with fellow participants, Cobb provides a controversial examination of the crucial place of firearms in the fight for American freedom.

(via cultureofresistance)

pretentioususernametosoundsmart:

gooseko:

iplaybassoon13:

dantheinsane1:

zenpencils:

ERICA GOLDSON: Graduation speech

Erica Goldson must have had some serious balls to give this speech

This is beautiful.

this is so wonderful 

This hit hard. Our education system is desperately in need of fixing.

(via psilolysergicamine)

"You don’t ask people with knives in their stomachs what would make them happy; happiness is no longer the point. It’s all about survival; it’s all about whether you pull the knife out and bleed to death or keep it in."

— Nick Hornby, How to Be Good (via lastuli)

(Source: splitterherzen, via anonymousmilitant)

radicalarchive:

‘The Black Uprisings’, Socialist Workers Party, United States, 1967. Looks at the rebellions in Detroit, Michigan and Newark, New Jersey.

radicalarchive:

‘The Black Uprisings’, Socialist Workers Party, United States, 1967. Looks at the rebellions in Detroit, Michigan and Newark, New Jersey.

(via theblackcommunist)

postracialcomments:

NO REALLY
CAN WE PLEASE?!?!?!?

postracialcomments:

NO REALLY

CAN WE PLEASE?!?!?!?

(Source: antidelusions, via xuron)

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Albuquerque Police Department Buildings Smeared with Red Paint, Symbolizing Blood on Their Hands
"This is political expression. If you had a fancy art degree, like I do, you would realize that the red paint has symbolic significance. If you fought an insurgency in Iraq, like I have, you would know about asymmetrical warfare.
"The public that is aghast at the shooting of James Boyd recognizes that their voices are muted. They get two minutes of commentary at a City Council meeting. Some of the councilors listen. Some play on their phones. Some worry about what’s for dinner. Who has apologized to the public for not only the shooting but the release of a horrifying video thought to exonerate the shooting? Yes, the video was released by the police because when the Chief of Police saw that video he thought, “That’s a justifiable slaying and once I show this to the public they will stop scrutinizing this shooting.” Yet the rest of us, anyone with a stomach, want to vomit all over ourselves at what is revealed in that video. 
"That is how out of touch APD is with the reality on the ground. And our civilian leadership, just like in Iraq, don’t have the moral backbone to ask the hard questions and make the hard choices. So. The public knows that their voices are muted. They know that their methods of expression must be asymmetrical in order to have any chance of being heard. 
"I understood why Iraqi insurgents fighting a foreign occupation resorted to "illegitimate" tactics. They could not afford to go toe to toe with us. We had kevlar and unlimited rounds and years of training. They had an old Nissan and ammunition dating back to the Iran-Iraq War. 
"I understand why red paint is plastered in broad angry strokes dripping down the sides of APD buildings. Blood is on our hands. You worry about taxpayer cost of political graffiti to a couple buildings? You are missing the picture, my friends. Look a little closer. There are corpses shuttered in that building that want out." 
—- unnamed author
Via Revolution-News

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Albuquerque Police Department Buildings Smeared with Red Paint, Symbolizing Blood on Their Hands

"This is political expression. If you had a fancy art degree, like I do, you would realize that the red paint has symbolic significance. If you fought an insurgency in Iraq, like I have, you would know about asymmetrical warfare.

"The public that is aghast at the shooting of James Boyd recognizes that their voices are muted. They get two minutes of commentary at a City Council meeting. Some of the councilors listen. Some play on their phones. Some worry about what’s for dinner. Who has apologized to the public for not only the shooting but the release of a horrifying video thought to exonerate the shooting? Yes, the video was released by the police because when the Chief of Police saw that video he thought, “That’s a justifiable slaying and once I show this to the public they will stop scrutinizing this shooting.” Yet the rest of us, anyone with a stomach, want to vomit all over ourselves at what is revealed in that video.

"That is how out of touch APD is with the reality on the ground. And our civilian leadership, just like in Iraq, don’t have the moral backbone to ask the hard questions and make the hard choices. So. The public knows that their voices are muted. They know that their methods of expression must be asymmetrical in order to have any chance of being heard.

"I understood why Iraqi insurgents fighting a foreign occupation resorted to "illegitimate" tactics. They could not afford to go toe to toe with us. We had kevlar and unlimited rounds and years of training. They had an old Nissan and ammunition dating back to the Iran-Iraq War.

"I understand why red paint is plastered in broad angry strokes dripping down the sides of APD buildings. Blood is on our hands. You worry about taxpayer cost of political graffiti to a couple buildings? You are missing the picture, my friends. Look a little closer. There are corpses shuttered in that building that want out."

—- unnamed author

Via Revolution-News

"Karl Marx did not invent or found socialism…he just discovered it…We call in America the laws of gravity, Newton’s Laws but Newton cannot invent that a body falls at 32 feet per second squared. Marx cannot invent where capital oppresses labor that labor will rise up and overthrow capital."

— Kwame Ture, responding to the oft-cited claim that socialism is a product of Europe and Eurocentric thought (via mansplainedmarxist)

(via theyoungradical)

"Capitalism works best when people are not individual people with celebrated differences, but identical workers, cogs in the machine. Once diverse cultural identities are stripped away, the only culture left to identify with is capitalist culture."

Cultural Appreciation or Cultural Appropriation?  (via afrometaphysics)

(Source: probablyasocialecologist, via sans-nuage)

"The message is clear. Boys are the norm, girls the variation; boys are central, girls peripheral; boys are individuals, girls types. Boys define the group, its story and its code of values. Girls exist only in relation to boys."

— Katha Pollitt, "Hers; The Smurfette Principle" (h/t: "Ms. Male Character - Tropes vs Women in Video Games")

(via the-uncensored-she)

"There are 45 muslim countries. Not one of them has assaulted a western country in the past 200 years. It was always us who attacked militarily (…) When I read that still 83% of Germans think Muslims are fanatics, it becomes clear how little we know about the Muslim world. The fanatics are sitting in the West."

Inteview with Jürgen Todenhoffer, author of “Why do you kill Zaid”

Source: http://www.taz.de/!26970/

(via allwarandpeace)

(via theyoungradical)

"… my contempt for the intellectual world reaches such heights that I have no interest in pursuing them in their gutters, unless there are serious human interests involved, as [there often are] in the political realm."

— Noam Chomsky (via indizombie)